Feb 12, 2011

Manu aT D’a ciTy hearT!!...



>:)
 Dusk fantastic colors... 
 ...here we go again ....
....testing the new toy Sony Nex 5...  
:)


AVENIDA  DOS  ALIADOS 
THE  MONUMENTAL  HEART  OF  
PORTO 



The imposing Avenida dos Aliados is the heart of the city, a sloping boulevard lined with grand buildings and a central promenade. 






Most of the buildings are hotels or main branches of the country's major banks, while the central promenade used to be a garden but was remodelled in 2006 by renowned architect Alvaro Siza Vieira who also designed the city's Serralves Museum. 



City Hall on top. :)


At the top of the avenue stands the Town Hall, a palatial building with a tall bell tower (70m high). 





















Made of granite and marble, its design was influenced by municipal architecture of Flanders and France. 





In front of the building is a modernist statue of Portuguese writer Almeida Garrett. 


At the other end of the avenue is Praça da Liberdade, a square adorned with a statue of King Pedro IV on a horse. 




Guarany on top!! :)


There are also several cafes, including the historical Guarany. Sit at one of the tables on the pavement outside to watch the world go by, and pass by the city's main tourism office by the Town Hall.

INFO:








S. Bento Train station

All about S. Bento train Station at my:





Having loadz of fun with that's funky 'panorama sweep' function...here we go again.... Ahhh! :)



Lá ao fundo está em construção o Hotel CONTINENTAL.... Previsto p inaugurar este Verão... Hope so, indeed!! :) 




Cá tá o Hotel.... 
CONTINENTAL HOTEL under construction. Plus,u can see Clérigos church on top of the street!! :) 



U guys....u can see they are building up a new hotel in the background... CONTINENTAL HOTEL.... hopefuly for summer 2011....  :)




PS:
... + 1 hotelinho baratuxo pa ficar hospedada qd n me apetecer dormir em casa... !!! 
>:D







More on PORTO at:
www.portugal-live.net/UK/places/porto
and
www.manuworldnews.blogspot.com/Porto



:) 





Coming back again as soon as possible... 


<:-)

Feb 1, 2011

ThaT bRigHt raiLwaY sTaTion....



:)

S. Bento railway station... Huge sunsets make photo wonders!! 




The São Bento Train Station (Portuguese: Estação de São Bento) is located in the city ofPorto, in Portugal. Inaugurated in 1916, the historical station is known for its tile (azulejo) panels that depict scenes of the History of Portugal. It is located in the Almeida Garret Square, in the centre of the city.




Tiles
The most notable aspect of São Bento Station are the large, magnificent tile panels in the vestible. The tiles number 20 thousand, date from 1905–1916 and are the work of Jorge Colaço, the most important azulejo painter of the time.
The panels depict landscapes, ethnographic scenes as well as historical events like the meeting of knight Egas Moniz and Alfonso VII of León (12th century), the arrival ofKing John I and Philippa of Lancaster in Porto (1387) and the Conquest of Ceuta (1415).


video
:)
Testing Sony Nex5 videos... 

History
The name of the station derives from a Benedictine monastery built on this spot in the 16th century. The monastery fell victim of a fire in 1783, was later rebuilt, but was in a grave state of disrepair at the end of the 19th century. In the context of an expansion of the railway system in Portuguese territory, King Carlos I laid the first stone of the station in 1900. The project was entrusted to Porto architect José Marques da Silva, who designed a building under the influence of French Beaux-Arts architecture





A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, metal, or evenglass. Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlite, wood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from theFrench word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of baked clay.

Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made from ceramic, with a hard glaze finish, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, marble, granite, slate, and reformed ceramic slurry, which is cast in a mould and fired.

INFO: www.wikipedia.org/Tile




Jorge Colaço (Tangier 1868 - Oeiras, 1942) was a Portuguese painter specially known for his works as tile(azulejo) painter.
Jorge Colaço was born in Tangier, Morocco, the son of a Portuguese diplomat [1]. He studied art in Lisbon,Madrid and Paris.
Even though Jorge Colaço was a canvas painter and caricaturist, he specialised in designing and paintingazulejo panels to decorate large surfaces. His designs had a late Romantic taste, celebrating the achievements of Portuguese history. Along with historical themes, he also produced ethnographic and landscape scenes [2].
Among his most important works are tile panels in the Palace Hotel of Bussaco (1907); São Bento Train Station in Oporto (1905–1916); Sports Pavilion of Eduardo VII Park in Lisbon (1922); façade of Santo Idelfonso Church in Oporto (1932) and many others. He also has works in Brazil, England (Windsor Castle), Geneva(Centre William Rappard and other countries.
 Info: www.wikipedia.org/JorgeColaço


More about Jorge Colaço:
www.lisboapatrimoniocultural.pt/JorgeColaço



Rail transport is the means of conveyance of passengers and goods by way of wheeled vehicles running on rail tracks. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles merely run on a prepared surface, rail vehicles are also directionally guided by the tracks they run on. Track usually consists of steel rails installed on sleepers/tiesand ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves. However, other variations are also possible, such as slab track where the rails are fastened to a concrete foundation resting on a prepared subsurface.

Rolling stock in railway transportation systems generally has lower frictional resistance when compared with highway vehicles, and the passenger and freight cars (carriages and wagons) can be coupled into longer trains. The operation is carried out by a railway company, providing transport between train stations or freight customer facilities. Power is provided by locomotives which either drawelectrical power from a railway electrification system or produce their own power, usually by diesel engines. Most tracks are accompanied by a signalling system. Railways are a safe land transportation system when compared to other forms of transportation. Railway transportation is capable of high levels of passenger and cargo utilization and energy efficiency, but is often less flexible and more capital-intensive than highway transportation is, when lower traffic levels are considered.

The oldest, man-hauled railways date to the 6th century B.C, with Periander, one of the Seven Sages of Greece, credited with its invention. With the British development of the steam engine, it was possible to construct mainline railways, which were a key component of the industrial revolution. Also, railways reduced the costs of shipping, and allowed for fewer lost goods. The change from canals to railways allowed for "national markets" in which prices varied very little from city to city. Studies have shown that the invention and development of the railway in Europe was one of the most important technological inventions of the late 19th century for the United States, without which, GDP would have been lower by 7.0% in 1890. In the 1880s, electrifiedtrains were introduced, and also the first tramways and rapid transit systems came into being. Starting during the 1940s, the non-electrified railways in most countries had their steam locomotives replaced by diesel-electric locomotives, with the process being almost complete by 2000. During the 1960s, electrified high-speed railway systems were introduced in Japan and a few other countries. Other forms of guided ground transportation outside the traditional railway definitions, such as monorail or maglev, have been tried but have seen limited use.


INFO: www.wikipedia.org/Railway





I'll b coming soon..... 
:)
i know u'll miss me a lot while i am away...!!! 
.... i'll miss u too...!!


:)


25th ApriL briDge

:)





25 de ABRIL BRIDGE (25th April Bridge)

The 25 de Abril Bridge (Ponte 25 de Abril "25th of April Bridge", Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpõt(ɨ) ˈvĩt(ɨ) ˈsĩku dɨ ɐˈbɾiɫ]) is a suspension bridge connecting the city of Lisbon, capital of Portugal, to the municipality of Almada on the left (south) bank of the Tejo river. It was inaugurated on August 6, 1966 and a train platform was added in 1999. Because of its similar coloring, it is often compared to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, USA. In fact, it was built by the same company (American Bridge Company) that constructed the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and not the Golden Gate, also explaining its similarity in design. With a total length of 2,277 m, it is the 20th largest suspension bridge in the world. The upper platform carries six car lanes, the lower platform two train tracks. Until 1974, the bridge was named Salazar Bridge (Ponte Salazar).


History

Construction

From the late 19th century there had been proposals to build a bridge for Lisbon. In 1929 the idea advanced as a Portuguese engineer and entrepreneur, António Bello requested a Government concession for a railway crossing between Lisbon and Montijo (where the Vasco da Gama Bridge, the second bridge serving Lisbon, was later built in 1998). As a result, the Minister of Public Works, Duarte Pacheco, created a commission in 1933 to analyse the request. The commission reported in 1934, and proposed building a road and rail bridge. Bids were obtained. However, this proposal was subsequently put aside in favour of a bridge crossing the river at Vila Franca de Xira, 35 km north of Lisbon.
In 1953 a new Government commission started working and recommended building the bridge in 1958, choosing the southern anchor point adjacent to the recently built monument to Christ the King (Cristo-Rei). In 1959 the international invitation to tender for the project received four bids. In 1960 the winner was announced as a consortium headed by the United States Steel Export Company, which had submitted a bid in 1935.
Construction began on November 5, 1962. Forty-five months later (six months ahead of schedule) the bridge was inaugurated on August 6, 1966. Presiding at the ceremony was the President of Portugal, Admiral Américo Thomaz. Also present were the Prime-Minister, António de Oliveira Salazar, and the Patriarch of Lisbon, Cardinal Manuel Gonçalves Cerejeira. The bridge was named Salazar Bridge (Ponte Salazar), in honour of the Prime Minister.[citation needed]
The bridge was built by the American Bridge Company, part of the winning consortium and aided by eleven local companies. The steel was imported from the USA. Four workers lost their lives, out of a total of 3,000 who worked on the site. Construction took a total of 2,185,000 man-hours of work. The total cost of the bridge came to 2,200,000,000 Portuguese escudos, or US $ 32 million (US $201 million in 2006 adjusted for inflation).


25 de ABRIL BRIDGE (25th April Bridge)

The 25 de Abril Bridge (Ponte 25 de Abril "25th of April Bridge", Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpõt(ɨ) ˈvĩt(ɨ) ˈsĩku dɨ ɐˈbɾiɫ]) is a suspension bridge connecting the city of Lisbon, capital of Portugal, to the municipality of Almada on the left (south) bank of the Tejo river. It was inaugurated on August 6, 1966 and a train platform was added in 1999. Because of its similar coloring, it is often compared to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, USA. In fact, it was built by the same company (American Bridge Company) that constructed the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and not the Golden Gate, also explaining its similarity in design. With a total length of 2,277 m, it is the 20th largest suspension bridge in the world. The upper platform carries six car lanes, the lower platform two train tracks. Until 1974, the bridge was named Salazar Bridge (Ponte Salazar).


History

Construction

From the late 19th century there had been proposals to build a bridge for Lisbon. In 1929 the idea advanced as a Portuguese engineer and entrepreneur, António Bello requested a Government concession for a railway crossing between Lisbon and Montijo (where the Vasco da Gama Bridge, the second bridge serving Lisbon, was later built in 1998). As a result, the Minister of Public Works, Duarte Pacheco, created a commission in 1933 to analyse the request. The commission reported in 1934, and proposed building a road and rail bridge. Bids were obtained. However, this proposal was subsequently put aside in favour of a bridge crossing the river at Vila Franca de Xira, 35 km north of Lisbon.
In 1953 a new Government commission started working and recommended building the bridge in 1958, choosing the southern anchor point adjacent to the recently built monument to Christ the King (Cristo-Rei). In 1959 the international invitation to tender for the project received four bids. In 1960 the winner was announced as a consortium headed by the United States Steel Export Company, which had submitted a bid in 1935.
Construction began on November 5, 1962. Forty-five months later (six months ahead of schedule) the bridge was inaugurated on August 6, 1966. Presiding at the ceremony was the President of Portugal, Admiral Américo Thomaz. Also present were the Prime-Minister, António de Oliveira Salazar, and the Patriarch of Lisbon, Cardinal Manuel Gonçalves Cerejeira. The bridge was named Salazar Bridge (Ponte Salazar), in honour of the Prime Minister.[citation needed]
The bridge was built by the American Bridge Company, part of the winning consortium and aided by eleven local companies. The steel was imported from the USA. Four workers lost their lives, out of a total of 3,000 who worked on the site. Construction took a total of 2,185,000 man-hours of work. The total cost of the bridge came to 2,200,000,000 Portuguese escudos, or US $ 32 million (US $201 million in 2006 adjusted for inflation).


25 de Abril Bridge.
Soon after the Carnation Revolution in 1974, the bridge was renamed the 25 de Abril Bridge, the day the revolution had occurred. A symbol of those times was captured on film, with citizens removing the big "Salazar" brass sign from one of the main pillars of the bridge and painting a provisional "25 de Abril" in its place.


Expansion

The upper platform, running 70 m above water, started carrying 4 car lanes, two in each direction, with a dividing guardrail. On July 23, 1990, this guardrail was removed and a fifth, reversible lane was created. On November 6, 1998 the side walls were extended and reinforced to make space for the present six lanes. Cars crossing the bridge make a peculiar hum - listen (59s) - as two of the lanes are metallic platforms instead of asphalt.[citation needed]
Since June 30, 1999, the lower platform carries two railroad tracks. To accommodate this, the bridge underwent extensive structural reinforcements, including a second set of main cables, placed above the original set, and the main towers were increased in height. The rail line had been part of the initial design, but was eliminated for economy, and the initial structure had been lightened. Original builder American Bridge Company was called again for the job, performing the first aerial spinning of additional main cables on a loaded, fully operational suspension bridge.[citation needed]
Traffic soon increased well beyond predictions, and has remained at maximum capacity despite the enlargement from four to six lanes, the addition of the rail line, and the building of a second bridge serving Lisbon, the Vasco da Gama Bridge. A third bridge has been on and off Government plans for some time.
Several movies have been filmed on the bridge, including some scenes in the 1969 James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service when James Bond is in a car with Marc Ange Draco's henchmen and they drive across a bridge, and the bridge is featured near the end of the movie when Bond marries Tracy and drives with her in Bond's Aston Martin across the bridge again.


Tolls

The bridge was projected to have paid all debt in 20 years, and to become toll-free (or reduced toll) after that period. However the Government kept charging tolls well beyond the 20 year period, until it gave the concession to Lusoponte, creating a monopoly of the Tagus crossing in Lisbon. As such, the bridge has always required a toll, first in both directions and from 1993 northbound only, with the toll plaza situated on the south bank of the Tagus river. The tolls have become a source of political dispute in recent years.
When opened, one had to park their car and walk to buy the toll ticket costing 20 escudos. In June 14, 1994, the Government, which ran the bridge at the time, raised the toll by 50% (100 to 150 escudos), to prepare to give the bridge into private concession for 40 years from January 1, 1996. The concessionaire was Lusoponte, a private consortium formed to build the Vasco da Gama Bridge at zero-cost to the public finances in exchange for tolls from both bridges. As a result, a popular uprising led to road blockades of the bridge and consequent police charges, and event which made the then right-wing Government highly unpopular and which many believe led to a centre-left win in the 1995 general elections. As of 2009, the toll is set at € 1.35 for passenger cars, northbound (into Lisbon). There is no toll southbound and no toll either way during August


Design

The 25 de Abril Bridge is based on the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge [SFOBB] near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, USA. Both SFOBB and the 25 de Abril Bridge were built by the same company. The American Society of Civil Engineers says that "Like its sister bridge, the SFOBB in San Francisco, the Tagus River Bridge is located in an area with a long history of earthquakes" and seismic data had to be taken into account in its construction. Another sister bridge is the Forth Road Bridge in Edinburgh.
Upon completion the bridge had the longest suspended span and the longest main span in Continental Europe, the world's longest continuous truss, and the world's deepest bridge foundation. It was the fifth largest suspension bridge in the world, the largest outside the USA. Today it is the 20th largest suspension bridge in the world.


Numbers

In 2006 a daily average of 150,000 cars cross the bridge, including 7,000 on the peak hour. Rail traffic is also heavy, with a daily average of 157 trains. In all, around 380,000 people cross the bridge daily (190,000 if considering return trips).
Other numbers:
1012,88 m - length of main span
2277,64 m - length of truss
70 m - height from water to upper platform
190,47 m - height of main towers (second tallest structure in Portugal)
58,6 cm - diameter of each of the two sets of main cables
11,248 - number of steel wire strand cables, each 4,87 mm in diameter, in each set of main cables
54,196 km - length of steel wire strand cables making up the two sets of main cables
79,3 m - depth (below water-level) of the foundation of the south pillar
30 km - length of access roads
32 - viaducts in the access roads.


INFO:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/25_de_Abril_Bridge


See also about Vasco da Gama Bridge :
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasco_da_Gama_Bridge




25th April bridge, the Docas area. Time 4 some drinks.... 1 Cappuccino or a Cuba Libre for me....with Baccardi,please...and 3 BIG ice cubes... thank youuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu!!!!...
>:-)


I'll give u a clue,ok?
Look :
www.flickr.com/photos/_funknjazzy_/3578058129/in/set-7215...
:) Ahhhhhhh!!! I knew u wanted some Cappu too...!!!


NOTE :
All ....almost all ...almost all..... about that day in Lisbon at:
http://manuworldnews.blogspot.com/2010/06/lisbon-city-9-years-later.html

Or....
http://manuworldnews.blogspot.com/search/label/Lisbon

U can check out + at my Flickr account at:
www.flickr.com/photos/_funknjazzy_

Uffffffffffffffffffffff....
>:O)

Are u that tired of reading me??
I hope not... indeed.... eheheheh!!!
I am not....

:)

JeróNiMos MonaSteRy



:)
Sept. / Oct. 2010

The Hieronymites Monastery (Mosteiro dos JerónimosPortuguese pronunciation: [muʃˈtɐjɾu duʃ ʒɨˈɾɔnimuʃ]) is located in the Belém district of LisbonPortugal. This magnificent monastery can be considered one of the most prominent monuments in Lisbon and is certainly one of the most successful achievements of the Manuelinestyle (Portuguese late-Gothic). In 1983, it was classified by the UNESCO, with nearby Belém Tower, as a World Heritage Site.


Jerónimos Monastery, Lisbon city, Portugal.




Esta maltinha lá dentro do Mosteiro.... julgava k estava algures nas Docas ou no supermercado.... era tamanha a barulheira...Enfim.... 
Uma grd falta de respeito!! Shocking!!! Grrrrr :(



O meu pescoço reclama mas a minha alma agradece... muiiiito...muitoooooooo!!!
....Ohhhh ......'coisinha' maiiiiiiiii liiiiiinda esta!!! :) 
Bolazzzz!!!


History
The house for the Hieronymite monks was built on the same site of the Ermida do Restelo, a hermitage that was founded by Henry the Navigator at about 1450. It was at this hermitage, that was already in disrepair, that Vasco da Gama and his men spent the night in prayer before departing for India in 1497. (... ... )



Looking God!!! ... Looking so good!!!! :)))



Some other photos of this huge Monastery at:
http://www.google.pt/images.jeronimos.monastery





My Sept./Oct. 2010 Lisbon journey at:
http://manuworldnews.blogspot.com/2010/10/in-lisbon-again.html


www.manuworldnews.blogspot.com/lisbon


And more at my old Flickr account:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/_funknjazzy_/lisbon




Now that I’m back home, I discovered that all my pics & videos come out with too bad quality!!! LOL


NOTE:
:
It took me over 24 hours -- In over 2 weeks -- of HARD work to 'conclude' this LONGGGGGG post...  and i don't like the way it's looking now....
 :(((   Grrrrrrrr
>:)